GREAT FALL TRADITIONS

Featured styles: the Amarillo – Guns Blazin and Cactus – Marcher boots.

We love the crisp air and colors of fall – so much so, we’ve been exploring fun fall finds on Pinterest! To get into the spirit of the cooler months, we also asked our fellow international Skechers teams about their countries’ favorite fall traditions. Read on to hear how people abroad are celebrating the season!

Fall in Canada: Good Food, Family and Fun

Out of all four of our seasons, Fall always seems to be much anticipated and much enjoyed by Canadians. We love driving on the country roads admiring the trees adorned with red, yellow and orange leaves. Many of us take advantage of the refreshing weather and take the family out for an afternoon of picking apples and getting lost in a corn maze. We fully indulge at Thanksgiving (which is in October for us)… bringing home-cooked meals to the table and encouraging fun family time in the home. Toasting pumpkin seeds, baking fresh pies and watching Sunday football are just some of the memories Canadians love to make in the Fall.

Germany’s Goldener Oktober

Here in Germany, we love to take a walk especially when the weather is nice and the sun is shining. 🙂 Every tree is losing leaves and they become brown. But when the sun is shining, they look like they were golden and you go through a gigantic golden field of leaves. This is why we also call this time “Goldener Oktober” that means “Golden October.” For a lot of people, this is the most favorite season here in Germany!

Spain Gears Up for the Holidays

In Spain, we don’t have a national celebration during fall (over the years, Halloween has become more famous in our country, but it’s not a national activity). In some places, it’s very typical to do things like eat chestnuts. Much of our traditions during the cooler months focus on the coming Christmas and The Three Wise Men celebration – a time when the families get together, have nice lunches and dinners and exchange presents.

The UK: Guys Fawkes/ Bonfire Night

Remember, remember the fifth of November… Bonfire Night is also known as Fireworks’ Night or Guy Fawkes Night. It’s a British tradition dating back to the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, when Catholic conspirator Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. Many people get together to light bonfires and set off fireworks. In some towns and cities, it is popular for people attend a bonfire and professional firework display in a park. Due to its proximity to Halloween, many people organize a combined party for Guy Fawkes Night and Halloween. These parties often include elements from both festivals, such as a bonfire and dressing up in spooky outfits. Popular foods include toffee apples, bonfire toffee and potatoes baked in the ashes of the fire.

What traditions do your family and friends have for fall? Tell us in the comments!

Leave your comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: